About the Breed

The Welsh Springer Spaniel is a compact, solidly built dog, bred for hard work and endurance. Their body can give the impression of length due to its obliquely angled forequarters and developed hindquarters.

The back of the legs, chest, and underside of the body are feathered, and the ears and tail are lightly feathered. The only colour is a rich red-and-white.  Any pattern is acceptable and any white area may be flecked with red ticking.

Welsh Springers are often confused with the English Springer Spaniel, but there are marked differences. The Welsh Springer is slightly smaller, and its reddish markings on a white background as opposed to the English Springers black or liver-coloured markings. Both breeds are admired for their hunting abilities and their trademark trait of "springing" at game. This can be seen during play also, as a dog may "spring" on his toy. Some experts believe that the Welsh Springer Spaniel and the Brittany Spaniel share the same ancestry as there is a great deal of resemblance between the two breeds.  The Welsh Springer is larger than the English Cocker Spaniel.

Temperament

The Welsh Springer Spaniel is an active, loyal, and affectionate breed. They may meet unfamiliar strangers with barking when in the dog's territory, or act aloof, cautious or wary.  The breed is well known for being friendly and demonstrative to all members of the family, especially children, and accepting other pets of the household with a friendly, playful attitude.

The breed is quick to learn but can be headstrong, though with correct training can become very obedient. The Welsh Springer was bred for work and endurance, and as with many breeds of hunting dogs requires a regular exercise routine to keep them healthy and content. Without adequate exercise, a Welsh Springer Spaniel may appear hyperactive.  Some Welsh Springers can become clingy towards their owners and suffer separation anxiety when alone.